Books

  • This report sets out recommendations for public and private sector stakeholders to improve the funding of cancer services and treatment.

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  • FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    Every Second Counts: New Book Explores the Birth and Growth of the Largest Emergency Service Providers in the World

    ACCESS Health International and Tethys, an imprint of Yatra Books, launch the book at the

    Jaipur Literature Festival in India

    (New York, USA – January 28, 2018) Emergency medical response systems are a critical component of any nation’s healthcare system. Minutes and seconds can mean the difference between life or death. In his latest book, Every Second Counts, renowned scientist, businessman, and philanthropist William A. Haseltine tells the story of the largest emergency services provider in the world, providing medical, police, and fire emergency services.

    The Emergency Management and Research Institute (EMRI) is a not for profit institute launched in 2005 in a single state in India, Andhra Pradesh. Today, it operates in seventeen Indian states and territories and serves a population of more than seven hundred million. Users call into a free emergency 108 telephone number, which provides integrated medical, police, and fire emergency services. Each day, the EMRI 108 emergency system receives one hundred and fifty thousand calls and responds to almost twenty five thousand emergencies.  A single call center can provide service for up to fifty million people at a cost of $0.25 USD per person per year.

    The service is free to the user and costs the provider less than $15 USD per emergency, less than one percent of what an emergency call costs in the United States.

    The EMRI 108 system has served as a model for other not for profit and for profit organizations who provide similar services in other Indian states. Virtually the entire country is now covered by the service.

    “What the government of India has achieved in partnership with EMRI is nothing short of groundbreaking,” said William Haseltine. “I believe that the EMRI 108 services offer a model of efficiency and quality that all countries should emulate. The EMRI story proves that every government, with the right intentions and partnerships, can provide universal access to high quality and affordable care. It is my hope that this book provides a manual for policymakers and providers to achieve that goal medical care and other services including the delivery of high quality primary healthcare.”

    Dr. Haseltine is the founder, chair, and president of ACCESS Health International, a nonprofit organization dedicated to ensuring that all people no matter where they live, no matter what their age, have the right to access high quality and affordable healthcare and to lead healthy and productive lives. Every Second Counts is one in a series of books written by the organization to showcase outstanding examples of success.

    In addition to being the largest emergency services provider in the world, EMRI also represents one of the largest public private partnerships. Central and state governments in India share the entire cost but the service is provided by EMRI and other not for profit and for profit providing similar services. Every Second Counts is an inspiring story of political leadership, private sector engagement, and public access to care. The book is an important read for policymakers, business leaders, and healthcare leaders who care about providing high quality care at an affordable cost to all those in need.

    The book launch takes place on Sunday, January 28 at the Jaipur Literature Festival. It is available for preorder on Amazon.com and at accessh.org/every-second-counts.

    About the Author:

    William A. Haseltine, PhD, is the chair and president of ACCESS Health International, a nonprofit organization he cofounded in 2007. Dr. Haseltine has an active career in both science and business. He was a professor at Harvard Medical School and Harvard School of Public Health from 1976 to 1993, where he was founder and the chair of two academic research departments, the Division of Biochemical Pharmacology and the Division of Human Retrovirology. He is well known for his pioneering work on cancer, HIV/AIDS, and genomics. He has authored more than two hundred manuscripts in peer reviewed journals and is the author of several books, including Affordable Excellence: The Singapore Healthcare Story.

    About ACCESS Health International:

    ACCESS Health is an international think tank, advisory group, and implementation partner working to improve access to high quality and affordable healthcare. The organization currently operates across three continents. ACCESS Health country offices serve as advisors and knowledge partners to the public and private sector and work alongside public and private organization to implement health related policies and programs.

    About Tethys:

    Tethys, an imprint of Yatra Books, aims to reach out to audiences across the world, beyond the limitation of language, to address issues that impact our daily lives. Tethys evokes the continuity of knowledge traditions, just as the scope of our special publishing projects encompasses a range of ideas and disciplines across continents and cultures.

    About Yatra Books:

    Yatra Books was founded by Namita Gokhale, Neeta Gupta and Shuchita Mital in January 2005. Yatra is a multilingual publishing company specializing in original creative writing and high quality translations in English, Hindi and Indian languages.

     

     

     

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  • Taking inspiration from existing health system frameworks, ACCESS Health created a market forces framework that offers a lens for responding to local market dynamics and taking a more strategic long term view of strengthening primary care. It includes a concrete four step process for applying the framework to India and other settings.

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  • Below is the ACCESS Health poster presentation for the 13th International Breastfeeding and Lactation Symposium.

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  • Every Second Counts tells the story of the largest emergency services provider in the world. The Emergency Management and Research Institute (EMRI) launched in 2005 in a single state in India, Andhra Pradesh. Today, it operates in seventeen Indian states and territories and serves a population of more than seven hundred million. Each day, the emergency system receives one hundred and fifty thousand calls and responds to almost twenty five thousand emergencies. The service is free to the user and costs EMRI less than $15 USD per emergency, less than one percent of what an emergency call costs in the United States.

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  • Call9 delivers technology enabled emergency care to the bedside of residences in nursing homes within minutes of receiving the call. Call9 also provides nursing home based palliative care that honors the priorities older adults throughout their lifetimes. The person centric care model has resulted in exponential healthcare savings for each nursing home that Call9 serves.

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  • As part of a series of case studies on excellence in dementia care, Sofia Widén visited Denmark to study Danish companies and organizations. This study is part of a larger research effort in dementia care in Northern Europe. In this interview, Bo Iversen, Sales Manager at Life-Partners, discusses the new software and planning tool, IntelligentLIFE, which Life-Partners recently introduced.

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  • As part of a series of case studies on excellence in dementia care, ACCESS Health visited Denmark to study Danish companies and organizations. This study is part of a larger research effort in dementia care in Northern Europe.
    Rise Care Home (Rise Parken) strives to be at the forefront of dementia care. The home consists of eight houses, with twelve people in each house. Eighty percent of the residents at Rise Care Home live with dementia.

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  • This interview is part of a larger study of elder care and dementia care in Northern Europe. In this interview, ACCESS Health interviews Janne Rosvik about her work at the National Advisory Unit for Aging and Health in Oslo, Norway. The interview focuses on caregiving methods that may improve the quality of life and reduce agitation and depression among individuals who live with dementia.

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  • As part of a series of case studies on excellence in dementia care, ACCESS Health visited Denmark to study Danish companies and organizations. This study is part of a larger research effort in dementia care in Northern Europe.

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Interviews

  • Dr. Allen Power is an Eden Alternative certified geriatrician who advocates for person centered methods of care and communication that create wellbeing for those living with dementia. He has authored the books Dementia Beyond Disease and Dementia Beyond Drugs. His pioneering efforts have taught many care partners how to interpret the unmet needs of someone living with dementia that are often expressed by behaviors. In this interview he provides examples of how to meet such needs as an alternative to chemical and physical restraints and segregation from the community.

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  • Health systems are seeking methods to provide care in the home setting in an effort to lower costs and improve health outcomes. This is especially effective when such care keeps patients out of the hospital. In this interview, Dr. Bruce Leff describes the  Hospital at Home program that provides hospital level care in the home.

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  • In this interview Jackie and Lon Pinkowitz and Karen Love discuss the mission and activities of the Dementia Action Alliance. The Alliance challenges the stigma of dementia by hosting conversational meetings for those living with dementia and community members. The Alliance maintains a strong advocacy voice for person centered support of those living with dementia and their caregivers.

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  • In this interview Gerke de Boer and Annie Herder describe Cornelia Hoeve, which is an old farm house that is now home to twelve people living with dementia. The philosophy of Cornelia Hoeve is centered on stimulation, wellbeing, personal freedom, and the unique qualities of each patient. Cornelie Hoeve is designed to make life pleasant for residents. Residents can walk in the garden, help with daily households chores, and live with a great deal of independence. For example, they can decide when to wake up and where they would like to eat their meals. Staff have strong relationships with the residents, making farm life easier overall.

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  • With a growing population of older individuals, the need for palliative care has never been more pronounced. The Center to Advance Palliative Care successfully led the call to provide palliative care in hospital settings. Today, the Center is focused on making palliative care available in the home and community. In this interview, the Director of the Center to Advance Palliative Care Diane E. Meier, expresses the need to implement systems of care that better serve those living with chronic disease and their families. The Center to Advance Palliative care trains clinicians to provide around the clock access and coordinated care with a focus on the priorities of the patient.

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  • The Patient Centered Medical Home is a model of primary care that is comprehensive, patient centered, coordinated, and accessible. Patient Centered Medical Home staff works as a coordinated team that integrates health information to produce better health outcomes at a lower cost than traditional care. Medical Home practices prioritize continued efficiency and quality improvement. In this interview Michael Barr and Erin Giovannetti of the National Committee for Quality Assurance describe the Patient Centered Medical Home recognition program.

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  • As part of its studies of good practice in elder care, ACCESS Health visited the Netherlands to learn about the Dutch healthcare system and to speak with representatives at a few internationally recognized elder care groups. The attached document includes those interviews.

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  • Irene Leung is Chief Executive Officer of the Senior Citizen Home Safety Association in Hong Kong. The Senior Citizen Home Safety Association is the largest home safety alarm provider in Hong Kong. The alarm system includes an indoor stationary unit and a mobile unit. One button connects the users with a call center. Staff in the call center are well trained and speak several languages and dialects. Ms. Leung describes the safety alarm system and its importance for elderly people in Hong Kong.

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  • The following interviews are part of a greater research effort by ACCESS Health to identify best practices in elder care across a number of countries, including Sweden, the Netherlands, mainland China, and Hong Kong.

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  • In this interview Eloy van Hal explains how people with dementia live in De Hogeweyk, the Netherlands. De Hogeweyk is a village which is specifically designed for people with dementia. The residents live in small groups together, walk freely through the village and take part in regular community activities. A hairdresser, a supermarket, a restaurant, a theater, and parks give the village a typical community atmosphere. The village and the residents are frequently visited by visitors from the outside. De Hogeweyk receives a lot of attention from outside the Netherlands and its ideas are adapted in several countries. Eloy van Hal describes the challenges and benefits of living in a dementia village compared to a standard nursing home.

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Reports

  • This report is a summary of the lecture by Jeanna Thorslund at the Welfare Technology Conference, held in Stockholm, Sweden, in January 2015. Welfare technology is technology that can be used in the welfare sectors, such as in healthcare and in social care. Ms. Thorslund’s lecture addressed the legal aspects associated with developing and implementing welfare technology.

    This report is part of the Elder Care Case Studies project.

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  • This report provides background material and resources for the upcoming seminar “How Can Swedish Actors Meet the Global Demand Within Elderly Care?” on August 19, 2015. This report offers a point of reference for the discussion. Many countries demand Swedish elder care products. This report identifies market demand in China, India, and Singapore, where ACCESS Health International runs programs in elder care.

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  • The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) asked ACCESS Health International to identify and invite innovators from India to be a part of the Global Lab for Health. The Global Lab assembles teams and tools to identify high value innovations that radically reduce cost and improve access to healthcare, with a focus on innovations that may be transferrable to the United States. A goal of the Global Lab is to drive the adoption of these innovations at scale. ACCESS Health identified promising innovators in India and helped to connect them with potential adopters in the US and around the globe.

    This report outlines our work with the Global Lab and the innovations we found. The report discusses the challenges and opportunities associated with transferring innovations across healthcare systems and markets, as well as opportunities to find tune the engagement process with health innovators.

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  • The Joint Center For Housing Studies at the Harvard Graduate School of Design hosted a symposium to discuss opportunities in architecture, planning, and policy to enhance older adults’ well being through affordable, accessible, well connected housing, as well as through models of long term care that support aging in place. This report summarizes the presentations from the Harvard symposium.

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  • This report is based on a presentation on the economics of welfare technology by Dr. ?…ke Dahlberg, at a 2015 conference in Stockholm, Sweden. In his presentation, Dr. Dahlberg shares the findings of his cost benefit analyses of welfare technologies in Scandinavia.

    This report is part of the Elder Care Case Studies project.

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  • This is the English language summary of the first report issued by the Swedish organization Forum for Welfare/Forum för Välfärd. The report focuses on targeted prevention of diabetes and heart diseases, vertically integrated care, and technical solutions near the patient. Forum for Welfare runs three pilot studies to test the applicability of new theories of prevention, integration, and technology.

     

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  • The pursuit of integrated care for the elderly is a pressing issue, not only for Sweden but for a majority of the Western world. In particular, the design of payment systems for the providers of healthcare and social care plays an important role in affecting the conditions for integration between different areas of care. Based on a review of international research on integrated care for the elderly, this is an English language summary of the Swedish language report that presents six initiatives that have been described as successful in increasing integration. Each initiative differs in its design and in the characteristics of its payment system.

    Read the full Swedish report here.

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  • The pursuit of integrated care for the elderly is a pressing issue, not only for Sweden but for a majority of the Western world. In particular, the design of payment systems for the providers of healthcare and social care plays an important role in affecting the conditions for integration between different areas of care. Based on a review of international research on integrated care for the elderly, this report in Swedish presents six initiatives that have been described as successful in increasing integration. Each initiative differs in its design and in the characteristics of its payment system.

    Read the English language summary here.

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Case Studies

  • In 2015, ACCESS Health Singapore partnered with Alexandra Health System piloted the Stay Young Navigator program in the north of Singapore to train active seniors to help their peers manage chronic conditions by serving as liaisons for health services, community resources, and financial assistance programs.

    This focus group study was designed to explore the experiences and perceptions of older patients with chronic conditions, those involved in caring for them, namely family members and healthcare providers, and others who would be involved in delivering the program, such as potential employers and navigators.

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  • This case study profiles the Mobile Emergency Team for the Elderly in Uppsala, Sweden. The Mobile Team is a leading example of integrated elder care in Sweden. The team coordinates its work with that of ambulance services, Uppsala University Hospital, the telephone healthcare advisory line, primary healthcare clinics, municipal nurses in home healthcare teams, and homecare organizations.

    This case study is part of the Elder Care Case Studies project.

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  • This is the first part of a case study providing an in depth look at Care Company TioHundra and Swedish integrated elder care. Integrated elder care focuses on the integration of the work across care organizations such as hospitals and homecare providers. Part One of the case study provides a company overview and an interview with Chief Operating Officer Peter Graf.

    Click here to see Part Two, Part Three, Part Four, and Part Five. This case study is part of the Elder Care Case Studies project.

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  • Telegeriatrics is the extension of telemedicine to the elderly. The elderly’s combination of limited mobility and chronic health problems often makes this group ideal beneficiaries of distance medicine. This brief case study outlines the work of specialists at the Khoo Teck Puat Hospital who have been pioneers in telegeriatrics. They have put together a comprehensive trial of their technique, and the initial outcomes are promising.

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  • Worldwide, rapidly aging populations are forcing a paradigm shift in how to treat those with chronic diseases. While many patients are placed in nursing homes or hospices for their sunset years, they express an almost universal desire to continue living at home. This trend has created demand for homecare services so the elderly can be cared for without having to abandon their homes or independent lifestyles.

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